How far are you prepared to go…

…to enforce your opinion?
…to make the customer happy?
…to understand a different point of view?
…to get a promotion or a raise?
…to satisfy the stakeholders?
…to delight your customers?
…to be with your family every evening?
…to get that idea off the ground?
…to make a sale?

And finally, how far are you prepared to go to learn what you need to learn to answer these questions better?

First Steps

Firsts steps (whether you’re studying a new language, mastering a new art, changing your profession, or simply learning to walk) are always the hardest. 

They’re scary and dangerous; you might fall, you might fail, and even scarier, you might succeed, which could change everything. 

But your first steps don’t have to be perfect. If you fall, you’ll pick yourself up again. Just like when you learned to walk.

Don’t be afraid of failure. Don’t get discouraged. Keep trying, keep failing, and eventually, you’ll be confident to take one step at the time.

And each step will take you closer to your goals.

The Balance

I wish I could push myself harder, and I wish I could work smarter (not longer).

I wish I could read more (not faster) and I wish I could write more.

I wish I had more time for learning, but I also wish I had more time for teaching.

Some of these goals are more important than others, but this doesn’t mean that I can’t work towards all of them.

As always, balance is the key.

Predictable

Being predictable is not always a bad thing.

A predictable product that works well is much better than an unpredictable one that has no function.

Predictable story plot with much emotional substance and strong, interesting characters is much better than an unpredictable story with weak characters you can’t relate to.

Predictable move that gives great results is much better than unpredictable one executed on a whim.

But predictable has one drawback. It quickly becomes boring. And people tend to ignore boring.

The way around it? Every now and then do something unpredictable and risky. Even if it doesn’t work out, it will make your audience more invested, and your next predictable move more bearable.